Write a letter to your friend who has met with an accident and is recovering

You will be pleased with her neat Appearance and wholesome Countenance.

Write a letter to your friend who has met with an accident and is recovering

I have desir'd your Uncle to interpose in this Matter, and he writes to you on this Occa sion; and has promised to see Justice done you, in case your Complaints be reason able. However, I thought it my Duty to let you know it in time, that you may satisfy yourself, that no Care is wanting; and that you may favour us with a personal Visit; which will be a great Consolation to her, who craves, mean time, your Blessing and Prayers; and also to, Sir, Your dutiful Son. Stay positive and avoid dwelling on the negatives. I must be more punctually used by you, or else must deal as little punctually with others; and what then must be the Conse quence? In the Choice of these, your utmost Care and Caution will be necessary: for, by a Mistake here, you can scarcely conceive the fatal Effects you may hereafter experience: Wherefore, it will be proper for you to make a Judgment of those who are fit to be your Advisers, by the Conduct they have observed in their own Affairs, and the Reputation they bear in the World. And, my good Friend, when you and I recollect, that most of the noble Families in the Kingdom, as well as the genteel ones, had the Foundations of their Grandeur laid in Trade, I expect not, in such a Country as ours especially, that any Objection to my Advice will be form'd, either by you or your good Lady, on this Score, if you have not more significant Reasons proceed ing from the Boy's Turn of Mind and Inclination; which, I think, should always be consulted on these Occasions. Barret, I AM sorry your ill Usage constrains me to write to you in the most pressing manner.

Whether the taking of small Liberties, as you may think them, leads you not on to greater; for, let me tell you, you will not find it in your Power to stop when you will: And then, whether any Restraint at all will not in time be irksome to you? My whole Estate, let me tell you, Brother, at your Rate of Expence, would scarcely maintain you for Seven Years: And, think you as you will, I must believe it my Duty to leave enough to support my Off-spring, with pru dent Conduct, to the End of Time.

Do you think it is honest, to break thro' Engagements into which you have so solemnly entered; and which are no less the Rules of the Corporation you are to be one Day free of, than those of a private Family?

Write a letter of sympathy to a friend who has been involved in an accident

It is so much a Master's Interest to use his Apprentices well, that I am inclinable to think that when they are badly treated, it is oftener the Effect of Provocation than Choice. Do you think you have nothing to learn, either as to your Business, or as to the forming of your Mind? I will offer no Ex cuse for myself, for not writing oftener, tho' I have been strangely taken up by the Kindness and Fa vour of your good Friends here, particularly my Aunt Windus: For well do I know, that my Duty to my honoured Mother, ought to take place of all other Considerations. I must be more punctually used by you, or else must deal as little punctually with others; and what then must be the Conse quence? Your speedy Answer, whether or no you are disposed to accept of my Offer, will oblige, Your humble Servant. One Thing is at present in my own Power; and that is, to double my Dili gence, that his Family suffer as little as possible by his Remissness: And another, I hope, by God's Grace, will be; and that is, to avoid in my self, when my Time comes, those Failings which I see so blameable in him. She now sees nobody but whom she chuses to see: If she should be a Wife, it is more than probable she may dislike Restraints: and can you approve of a diffuse Conversation in one you desire to your self? I own my Fault, and never will be guilty of the like again. Douglas and you have lately contracted such an Intimacy, that you are hardly ever asunder; and as I know his Morals are not the best, nor his Circumstances the most happy, I fear he will, if he has not already done it, let you see, that he better knows what he does in seeking your Ac quaintance, than you do in cultivating his. And have not People given you Credit, because they think I will support you? And as you are a young Man, it is fit that you should lay up, by your Industry, against a more advanced Age, when the Exercise a Horse affords, will seem not only more suitable, but perhaps absolutely ne cessary to your Health; whereas now, it may rather pass for Wantonness and Affectation. From a Father to a Son.

Derham, I would have you neither wholly encourage nor discourage his Suit; for if, on Inquiry into his Character and Circumstances, I shall find that they are answer able to your Cousin's good Opinion of them, and his own Assurances, I know not but his Suit may be worthy of Attention.

Close the letter by wishing the person speedy recovery. Stay positive and avoid dwelling on the negatives.

sorry to hear about your accident letter

Consider only this one Thing, how long it is be fore he will be capable of entering into Business, or Reputation, as a Physician, if he ever does it at all: For who chuses to trust his Health to a raw and unexperienced young Man? Remember, you have no Time you can call your own, during the Continuance of your Contract; and must you abuse your Master in a double Sense; rob him of his Time, especially if any of it be Hours of Business; rob him of his Rest; break the Peace of his Family, and give a bad Example to others?

As to the unhappy young Man who has been guilty of so fatal an Indiscretion, I wish, if the known Cle mency and Good-nature of your Master may par don this Offence, he may let his Forgiveness teach him the Ingratitude and Inhumanity of injuring a Man, who is not only the proper Guardian of his Youth, but whose Goodness deserves the best Be haviour, tho' he be generous enough to excuse the worst.

sympathy letter for accident

From a young Lady to her Father, acquainting him with a Proposal of Marriage made to her. For I know not you'll excuse me, I'm sure whether Will's Genius is equal to that of an universal Merchant: For, the various Springs of Com merce, the Seasons for chusing proper Commo dities, and numberless Incidents that make a necessary Return of Gain precarious, are full Im ployment for the strongest Judgment; as a Man, by one ill-chosen Venture, often loses more than he gains by several successful ones.

Are you sure that they are not of the same Opinion as to their own? From the same, acquainting her Parents with her Marriage.

Sorry to hear about your accident letter

She lives just above Want, in a pleasant airy Place, and has a very honest diligent Husband, with whom she lives very happily, and the Man is exceedingly fond of Chil dren, very sober, and good-humour'd; and they have every thing very pretty about them. Pray don't straiten your selves out of Love to me. One Thing is at present in my own Power; and that is, to double my Dili gence, that his Family suffer as little as possible by his Remissness: And another, I hope, by God's Grace, will be; and that is, to avoid in my self, when my Time comes, those Failings which I see so blameable in him. Cousin William, I AM sorry you should have any Misunderstand ing with your Master: I have a good Opinion of him, and am unwilling to entertain a bad one of you. I have desir'd your Uncle to interpose in this Matter, and he writes to you on this Occa sion; and has promised to see Justice done you, in case your Complaints be reason able. I wish he did not, for his own sake. I make no doubt of her answering this Character. Please heed our request and get well soon! Her airy Flights, and gay Behaviour, are pleasing, as a Partner in Conversation, but will they be equally agreeable in a Partner for Life? If you do not, what must I think of a Man who deals worse with me, than he does with any body else?

Yet, Madam, I am not without Hope, from the Sincerity of my Affection for you, and the Honesty of my Intentions, to deserve in time, those Regards which I cannot at present flatter my self with.

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Write a letter to your friend about the serious accident you have met with.